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Welcoming the Wood Dragon: A Lunar New Year Celebration

About the Author























Ashleigh Smith
I'm Ashleigh Smith, a native to Northern Utah. I first gained a love of gardening with my grandmother as I helped her each summer.

I decided to make a career of it and have recently graduated with a Bachelor's degree in Horticulture from Brigham Young University - Idaho. My studies have focused on plant production while I also have experience in Nursery & Garden Center Operations.

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2 comments

  • Sue Feb 8

    Thanks for the enlightening and hopeful msg and the cool assortment of seeds to match the Lunar Year Celebration.


  • Dav. K Chow Feb 8

    As an Asian American, growing up in San Francisco Chinatown. “Chinese New Year” is a big deal.
    It generally starts with all the family members gathering together and have a New Year Eve dinner or you can have it on New Year day also.

    There are several dishes sever on this meal, each dishes has a symbolic meaning for the New Year.

    There is one dish that is vegetarian a dish. It is call the Buddhist dish, no meat whatsoever. The vegetables used for this dish according my mom recipe: Napa Cabbage, Chinese Celery, Carrot, Snow Pea, Iceberg Lettuce and cilantro. There are a lot ingredients, liked Lotus Root, Shiitake Mushrooms,Bamboo Shoots, Wood Ear Fungus, Seaweed that looks like black hair, very expensive and clear rice noodles. After the dish is done you put in a large serving plate and people would tear a lettuce leaf and spread some Hoy Sen Sauce or what you called Plum Sauce and then you put a tablespoon of the vegetables on to the lettuce leaves like a sandwich and that how we eat dish. There are several other dishes for the New Year, like, Roasted Pork, Steamed Fish, Oyster, prawns, Stewing Chicken with ginger and green onions dipping sauce. Each dish has a symbolic an meaning.

    You mention about the 🧧red envelope, the married couples generally give the red envelop with money inside to the kids and never been married relatives. When we were young we use to get a dollar or five dollars but now day its twenty dollars or as much as fifty dollars. I call it blackmail money or hush money. The kids would go to the internet and tell everyone how cheap you are if you give too small amount. We used to call it lucky money but now days I call it “extortion money.”
    Oh, another thing, you can say anything bad about person and no swearing for two weeks, that’s how long the celebration lasts. That is tough being an ex-navy man. In the Navy they taught you how to swear like a sailor.

    Also if you are going to set up a gift basket for Chinese New Year, this is what kind of vegetable we use to cook: Napa Cabbage, Snow Peas, Chinese Celery, Chinese Broccoli, can use Regular Broccoli, Choy Sum, Iceberg Lettuce, Cabbage, Lemongrass, Green Onion, and Cilantro. If you sell Chinese Long string beans seeds, that will be good.
    I think that is about it, Oh,
    “Happy Chinese New Year.” 🙏🐉🐲🥂🎉🧨💥🧧🪭🥡🥢


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